Anthony Cullen’s top tips for better travel photos

June 22, 2012 by Flight Centre UK

We’ve been inundated with hilarious entries into our World’s Worst Travel Photographer contest this week. Have you been voting for your favourites? This week’s winner will be announced this afternoon – stay tuned…

If the level of entries is anything to go by, it appears that many of you are in urgent need of photography advice! So we’ve called in the experts – award-winning photographer and contest judge Anthony Cullen shares his top tips for taking better travel snaps:

Anthony Cullen’s top travel photography tips

1. If you’re shooting from a train, plane, car, etc., put the camera close to the window. This helps reduce reflections and minimises the dirt on the window affecting your shot.

2. Zoom in with your lens if you want to take candid shots of people as they won’t be as self conscious with you being further away, and you may get a much more natural shot. The action of zooming out also helps make the background more out of focus and less distracting. If someone doesn’t want you to take their picture then it’s important to respect this.

Anthony Cullen's Bosnia fete - Observer/Hodge Award Winning Portfolio

3. If you’re taking pictures whilst moving at speed – whether on a speed boat, from a car window or hurtling down a black run on a snowboard! – then extending your arms out in front of you can give the action of a steady cam and help reduce shake.

4. Get some great angles, leading lines and converging diagonals in your landscape picture. If this involves lying on the ground, climbing a mountain then it’s worth it. Make sure you have interesting stuff in the foreground leading you into the background and avoid having your horizons half-way; try top third or bottom third line.

Anthony Cullen's Car boot sale

5. Leave your camera turned on when you’re shooting, you never know when the decisive moment may happen (most camera batteries with a decent standby will last for quite a while or carry a spare battery) and don’t keep putting the lens cap on; if you have a UV or skylight filter and a lens hood (probably more for DSLRs) this should be enough to protect the front element.

For more of Anthony’s work, visit his website. And read the story behind his stunning shot, Tomatina (which earned him tomato stains he’s still trying to get out), here.

Anthony Cullen's Tomatina

Before you start putting Anthony’s helpful tips into practice, enter your #crapsnaps into our competition and you could win a £500 Fuji X-S1 camera from Dixon’s and a photography course.

This competition is now closed for entries. Thanks to everyone who sent their crapsnaps our way.